Your button down kind of fits, but not quite

Recently I read this brilliant post from XL Hourglass about bras and posture and it made me think. Bras are very important for your posture, but clothes are also important.

What I’m going to describe is applicable for other clothes like jackets, coats and almost any woven fabric top, but the effect is the most obvious in button downs, so I’m going to concentrate on them.

There is a really big catch there for a busty girl. Until you are adding professional alterations or a shirt made for a large bust to the equation you often tend to get the first size that you are able to button, because if you get bigger shirt it means that sleeves are longer and it’s bulkier in the waist and so on. Lets say your bust circumference is 38″, so you are grabbing shirt that has 39″ (US size 10, note that it’s actually one size smaller than size chart suggests) in the bust and with a sigh (not the best look, too tight in the bust, too big in the waist, but I really need something for work) you are going home. Standard shirt from high street usually has back width roughly equal to the buttoned front width and something like 2-3″ allowance to let you move in it, lets assume it’s 3″ . So your new shirt back is 19.5″. Lets say shirt which was ok everywhere except the bust when you are stand strait was size 6. This gives us that you really need 18″ back. Well inch and a half is not a bug deal, right? But problem is that with such measurements to feel comfortable in the shirt you need something like 22″ in the front, but you have only 19.5. And to be actually able to button the damn thing you do the only thing you can do: you slouch.

You can blame your weak will, your heavy breasts, bad habits… but the reality is simple: if you stand strait an essential part of your wardrobe is useless and you can’t find replacement on high street.

Ok, button downs could be avoided, busty girl can opt for jersey tops after all ) But what about coats? What about having strict dress code at work?

That’s why I think that alterations, custom tailoring and speciality brands like Pepperberry, BiuBiu, Urkye and DD Atelier are very important for us. Bad posture doesn’t only makes you look ten times worse then you really are, it can cause medical problems in the long run.

The good thing is that wearing a right bra and woven fabric clothes made for a big bust it’s comfortable to keep a good posture and it’s actually a bit uncomfortable to slouch. They help us to come to the point when we can stand and sit and walk beautifully and be more healthy. And we really deserve this!

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2 thoughts on “Your button down kind of fits, but not quite

  1. contrary kiwi (@contrarykiwi)

    This is something I’ve not thought about before, but you’re right. I have no button downs, so I’m not bothered in that department, but jackets and coats are usually fairly restrictive on my bust, even when I go up enough of a size to stop the buttons gaping like crazy. I’m going to start paying attention to my posture in those jackets and coats to see if they cause me to slouch. I wish I could say they’ll be gone if they do, but I’ve yet to find a bust-friendly coat I actually like (and is warm).

    Reply
    1. nothingeverfits Post author

      Jackets aren’t that tough (you can always wear it unbuttoned and they usually have a deep V), but coats are very challenging for busty and curvy, I know it from experience.
      One of my warmer coats is tailored, it had a princess seams and pockets weren’t a problem, so it was a success. Puffed coat I wear if it’s really bad weather (like slush and strong wind) is just bulky, but sometimes I don’t care. And sheepskin coat I wear when it’s really cold has a very deep V, so I use pashmina with it, but it works pretty well even if it’s really cold (think -20F cold).
      So for me it looks like deep V is good if you don’t mind pashminas and princess seams are great for altering.

      Hope this helps a little. And good luck when shopping!

      Reply

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